Theatre In DC 
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  List Of Shows Coming Soon
Tiny Beautiful Things Jun 2 - Jun 28, 2020  
The Kennedy Center Tiny Beautiful Things
 
Based on the best-selling book by Cheryl Strayed (Wild) and adapted for the stage by Nia Vardalos (My Big Fat Greek Wedding), this "incredibly moving" (Time Out) play is about reaching when you're stuck, healing when you're broken, and finding the courage to take on the questions that have The kennno answers.
 
   
Le Nozze di Figaro Jun 10 - Jun 14, 2020  
Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center Le Nozze di Figaro
 
Figaro and Susanna are getting married. But the Count, Figaro's "boss", appears to be more interested in Susanna than in his Countess. Marcellina is after Figaro. Cherubino is in love with every woman he comes across. Unlikely alliances are formed, desire lurks behind every door, a dangerous game of intrigue begins. Who will marry whom? Whose love is real and whose is not? Will the men win or will the women outsmart them? Premiered in 1786, The Marriage of Figaro, the first opera of the Mozart/da Ponte trilogy, remains every bit as relevant in our time as it was in the 18th century. Maryland Lyric Opera brings you a new production of this incredible work directed by a legend of the opera world - Ruggero Raimondi.
 
   
The Day Emily Married Jul 10 - Aug 2, 2020  
Writer's Center The Day Emily Married
 
Pulitzer-prize winning playwright Horton Foote's play is set in 1950's Harrison, Texas. Emily Davis is about to be married and is determined not to let her parents talk her and her new husband, the strappingly handsome and ambitious Richard Murray, into living with them. But Emily's mother, Lyd, an expert in emotional blackmail, will not be deterred from getting her own way. Per New York Times' Ben Brantley's 2004 review, "If Harrison's stories of wrecked marriages, closet vices and family feuds give it a surface resemblance to Peyton Place, it also has a fair amount in common with the blasted heath of King Lear and the arid fields of Samuel Beckett's tramps.