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Don Juan
Don Juan

Don Juan
Gallaudet University
Thru - Oct 6, 2013

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Gallaudet University

Washington Post- Somewhat Recommended

"...The show doesn't consistently sustain the inventiveness of its opening, and there are passages that will try your patience - a flailing comic brawl, speeches and dialogue that don't entirely enliven the hypocrisy that Moliere was skewering. Commedia is hard, though, and the overall effect is of how well Faction of Fools, now in its fifth season, puts this sort of thing together. Listen to the well-timed gags of Neil McFadden's sound design (a Beyoncejoke is the broadest, by far); watch the sword fight done in silhouette. This is a troupe with tricks up its sleeve."
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Nelson Pressley



DCTheatreScene- Recommended

For those not versed in the legend of the centuries-old seducer, Don Juan (Sun King Davis) is a wealthy libertine with little on his mind other than the fair sex. In his not so noble pursuit, he has great success thanks to the help of sidekick and hireling Sganarelle (Charlie Retzlaff). Don Juan’s escapades inevitably invite the scorn of an angry father, with whom our dashing ladies man duels successfully, striking a mortal blow.
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Jon Boughtin



DC Metro Theater Arts- Recommended

"...Casanova. Lothario. Bill Clinton. Among the world’s famous playboys, the figure of Don Juan holds a special place in the theatre. Faction of Fools, DC’s premiere commedia troupe, have taken a stab at adapting a classic version of the Don Juan story. While Molière’s Don Juan features strong performances across the board, the production as a whole doesn’t quite hang together."

Justin Schneider



MD Theatre Guide- Recommended

"...To be sure, you cannot produce Don Juan without giving serious consideration to how you want to do its ending. After all, it is Juan’s fate that will determine his character’s purpose in the world as well as how your audience will respond to your production. Is it the triumph of religion over atheism? Of superstition over hedonism? Or something else? In the end, it is the end that the fools’ production does not rise to meet. Without that clarity, Sganarelle’s final request for a new master does not ring with the necessary ambiguity to be true, to itself or to the two hours that preceded it."
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Robert Michael Oliver